Year 11 Geography students recently completed a monumental academic feat. Each student designed and executed a ‘Senior Geography Project’. This task requires students to become intimately familiar with academic research methodologies, and in their own time, collect and analyse qualitative and quantitative data as related to their research aims and hypotheses.

The group of 10 students were encouraged to pursue areas of their own passion and as a result, the ten complete projects represented a diverse range of topics and highlight the range of themes that can be explored within the realm of a school subject that is all too often thought to just be maps and capital cities. By discovering and experimenting with these formal research methods, students have engaged in and got a small taste of research frameworks as found in university Honours programs and post-graduate degrees.
From primary producers’ perceptions on the introduction of innovative agricultural practices, through to the spatial trends in test cricket attendance rates and the game’s future longevity, these findings and recommendations came as a result of many hours of hard work and were truly diverse.
Jack Croft’s investigation, ‘Resident opinions of the growing presence of graffiti in Port Macquarie’, utilised surveys, community observations and an interview with Police Senior Constable Alan Rider. Jack concluded, based upon his investigations that although graffiti is perceived by residents to have negative social impacts, street art is considered an option by many that may be able to “create a tangible sense of place in Port Macquarie, resulting in a rise of people walking, whilst adding colour, vibrancy and character to the environment.”
Jack Croft

Other investigations explored a range of demographic trends in Port Macquarie and the challenges for the local community as a result of continued population growth including the provision of aged care and health services. 

Although arduous and time-consuming for each student, this process has seen them grow their range of academic skills and through research, analysis and communication, build shared knowledge and understanding of a range of geographical issues. 

As their teacher, I must congratulate them and affirm them for their efforts.

Well done guys. I am truly proud of you.

Lee Hancock, Geography Teacher