Girls Camp Report – Anneliese Cains

At SCAS we have the privilege to attend a camp every year, and this year the Year 9 cohort had the opportunity to travel to Barrington Tops. The experience of trekking across the bushland, weathering storms and torrential rain is designed to give us the necessary skills to make us useful individuals who can function in society. With an early start of 6:30am, the segregated buses (girls and boys) were off taking 2 hours to arrive at our destination. Due to a last minute change, the boys were off to a great start hiking first in the glorious sunshine, while us girls arrived at the lodge to partake in activities, such as mountain bike riding, bush skills and whitewater rafting.

Through these activities and the help of experienced guides, friendships were strengthened, helping us to realise the importance of team work, and putting in the effort to reap the rewards. Many of us stepped out of our comfort zone and achieved feats that we thought were impossible to attain.

On the third day, due to the pouring rain, our hike (girls’ hike) had to be changed to a road walk: 14km in the rain walking through the spectacular hilly landscape. We cooked and camped independently despite the rain, and although a little damp trekked on, heading for home the next day. Juxtaposing the experience of the girls with the boys will probably give rise to a different opinion – as we arrived home a few hours after the boys, we heard about the dreadful gastro which wreaked havoc for the boys as they stayed at the lodges on the final night. Many of the girls will remember this camp for the fun and great memories created, whilst for some of the boys, this camp may be one they will want to forget!

Boys Camp Report – Jono Kosmeier

Camp was wonderful. Other than the outbreak of gastro, torrential rain and backpacks that felt like boulders, everyone had a great time. 100 or so weary-eyed kids hopped on the bus early Tuesday morning, ready to embark on a 3 hour journey. As the girls arrived at the lodge the boys piled off the bus and began their two day, 25km hike throughout the mountain trails somewhere in the middle of the Barrington tops. About 6 hours, 14 kilometres and a few leech infested creek crossings later we arrived at the first camp. Everyone was extremely glad to finally be able to sit down and cook a proper (well, according to camping food standards) meal. After a hearty meal and a good night’s sleep everyone was pumped to hike another 10 kilometres, mostly uphill.

We eventually all arrived safely at our lunch spot: a beautiful waterfall that flowed into a swimming hole. The few daring souls that decided to brave the freezing water (not really freezing but close enough) were very lucky to come back with all 10 fingers and toes. After lunch we walked a short kilometre or so to the bus and began our journey to the lodge. After enjoying a meal with the girls we drove to our camp site and stayed there the night. The next morning (Thursday) we packed up and drove to the lodge. The girls then began hiking while we started doing activities. Half of us went kayaking down the rapids all afternoon while the other half learnt wilderness survival skills and played various team building games. It was that afternoon that it began. One by one the boys began getting sick, some even having to be taken home. The next morning we all packed up early and drove home.

Although camp may not have had the best ending, I feel like everyone still had an irreplaceable experience. As more and more people began feeling unwell, the staff and students worked together to make the best of the circumstances. The boy cohort really displayed the spirit of teamwork and friendship; helping those in need and cooperating with the teachers. I would like to especially thank Ms Strahley. Mr Kallmier and all of the staff who worked tirelessly behind the scenes to organise our camp. Thank you also to all the teachers who willingly gave up their week so that they could help create an experience that we will never forget.